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ASIAN ARCHITECTURE

ASIAN ARCHITECTURE

HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE III_SYLLABUS_2017-2018 CHINESE ARCHITECTURE CHINESE ARCHITECTURE: POWERPOINT JAPANESE ARCHITECTURE JAPANESE ARCHITECTURE: POWERPOINT KOREAN ARCHITECTURE KOREAN ARCHITECTURE: POWERPOINT INDIAN ARCHITECTURE INDIAN ARCHITECTURE: POWERPOINT ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTHEAST ASIA PART 1 ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTHEAST ASIA PART 1: POWERPOINT ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTHEAST ASIA PART 2 ARCHITECTURE IN […]

ROMANESQUE TO 20TH CENTURY ARCHITECTURE

ROMANESQUE TO 20TH CENTURY ARCHITECTURE

During this period in the history of architecture and human civilization, religion and social hierarchy  played a great part in shaping and influencing the development of architecture. Christianity became the unifying force that influenced the development of church architecture throughout Europe especially on areas and […]

PRE-HISTORIC TO EARLY CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE

PRE-HISTORIC TO EARLY CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE

History of architecture started from the simplest structures constructed and designed based on the basic requirement of having a shelter. Man acted based on his instinct of survival producing the simplest type of shelter. From lean-to construction, man experimented on building more complex shelters using different materials that can be found nearby. Pre-historic architecture was constructed with branches of trees as the main frame and leaves or animal skin as covering. As the human civilization progress, their needs became more complex. Ancient beliefs and the birth of religion enabled man to produce architecture that go beyond his physical needs. To satisfy his curiosity, provide venue for worship, man built temples, monuments and other buildings that reflected his religious aspirations. Government buildings, palaces and other structures that represent power and social hierarchy were also developed signifying order and social organization. Materials such as bricks, stones and paint, and advance construction gave an opportunity to build complex structures that last longer and were built stronger and bigger. The Egyptians built pyramids as burial chamber for  their pharaohs, Greeks erected temples in honor of their gods, Romans constructed the Colosseum in Rome that became the largest amphitheater ever built, the early Christians built churches and the Byzantines completed Hagia Sophia that is considered to be the most important Byzantine structure and one of the world’s great monuments.

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Abu Simbel, Nubia Egypt. Egyptian Architecture
Abu Simbel, Nubia Egypt

Abu Simbel is a temple complex, originally cut into a solid rock cliff, in southern Egypt and located at the second cataract of the Nile River. The two temples which comprise the site (The Great Temple and The Small Temple) were created during the reign of Ramesses II (c. 1279 – c. 1213 BCE) either between 1264 – 1244 BCE or 1244-1224 BCE. The discrepancy in the dates is due to differing interpretations of the life of Ramesses II by modern day scholars. It is certain, based upon the extensive art work throughout the interior of the Great Temple, that the structures were created, at least in part, to celebrate Ramesses’ victory over the Hittites at the Battle of Kadesh in 1274 BCE. To some scholars, this indicates a probable date of 1264 BCE for the initial construction as the victory would have been fresh in the memory of the people. However, the decision to build the grand monument at that precise location, on the border with the conquered lands of Nubia, suggests to other scholars the later date of 1244 BCE in that it would have had to have been begun after the Nubian Campaigns Ramesses II undertook with his sons and was built as a symbol of Egypt’s power. READ MORE

Parthenon, Greece. Greek Architecture
Parthenon, Greece

An architectural order describes a style of building. In classical architecture each order is readily identifiable by means of its proportions and profiles, as well as by various aesthetic details. The style of column employed serves as a useful index of the style itself, so identifying the order of the column will then, in turn, situate the order employed in the structure as a whole. The classical orders—described by the labels Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian—do not merely serve as descriptors for the remains of ancient buildings, but as an index to the architectural and aesthetic development of Greek architecture itself. READ MORE

Oculus of Pantheon in Rome, Italy. Roman Architecture
Pantheon, Rome, Italy

The Pantheon from Greek Πάνθειον Pantheion meaning “[temple] of every god”) is a former Roman temple, now a church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). The present building was completed by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. He retained Agrippa’s original inscription, which has confused its date of construction as the original Pantheon burnt down so it is not certain when the present one was built. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 142 feet (43 m). READ MORE

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The files uploaded and links provided may contain copyrighted materials such as images, videos and published articles of which has not been specifically  authorized by the copyright holders. These materials were used to produce modules, handouts, and powerpoint presentations that were made available for download. The purpose of this page is to enhance the access to research and education related to architectural history. No copyright infringement intended. 

CONCEALED JAPANESE HOMES – Zoe Cooper

CONCEALED JAPANESE HOMES – Zoe Cooper

As in many industrialized nations, Japan’s population is heavily concentrated in its urban areas, with over 90% of its citizens living in crowded cities. As a result, land plots tend to have small, narrow footprints meant to create living space for as many households as […]

21 WAYS ARCHITECTS CAN WORK SMARTER, NOT HARDER – MICHAEL KILKELLY

21 WAYS ARCHITECTS CAN WORK SMARTER, NOT HARDER – MICHAEL KILKELLY

In their day-to-day work, architects face a lot of distractions and challenges: managing clients, collaborators and contractors; keeping up to date with the latest software and technologies; drafting planning applications and paperwork; and if you’re lucky, even getting to design some things in between. Originally published […]

HOW TO NAME YOUR DESIGN FIRM – LIFE OF AN ARCHITECT, BOB BORSON

HOW TO NAME YOUR DESIGN FIRM – LIFE OF AN ARCHITECT, BOB BORSON

One the first things you must consider when starting your new architectural firm, is what to name it. The choices are varied and the ramifications staggering. If the personality of the firm is going to be projected by the name, you had better take it seriously – every one else will. That’s where Life of an Architect can help (not really) – because I am a creative and critical thinker and somebody has to think about these things.

Originally, before architects were licensed, professionals and to add some credibility to the profession to help distinguish themselves from the other trade crafts (like carpenters and contractors), architecture firms turned to law firms as an example and starting stringing together the last names of the founding individuals or partners (i.e. McKim, Mead & White) . This method is still wildly used simply because it is the easiest, albeit least creative, method. It doesn’t take much to recognize that some of the older more established firms have chosen this method:

Safe? Boring? I don’t know … maybe classic is a better word  – at worst these certainly aren’t very exciting, nor do they display the panache and overwhelming creativity that many of the younger firms are trying to project. Eventually, as the initial leadership retires and the next wave of partners take over, the names are reduced down to initials to help ease that transition. Here is a consideration for you: In the beginning when you open your doors for business, everybody gets to work with the person whose name is on the door. After a while, if you have experienced some measure of success, new clients will invariably meet with a variety of people who don’t have your name and those clients are going to wonder why aren’t they getting you? Despite the talents of the people they are dealing with, they came to Bob Borson Architects … so why aren’t they getting Bob Borson? (And really, who doesn’t think that?) There is a methodology I am working on to help you make your decision and it is based on a practice perfected by the owners of Chinese restaurants and Multi-family apartment complexes.

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WHY HIRE AN ARCHITECT

WHY HIRE AN ARCHITECT

What do Architects do? And how can they help you? Why hire an architect? Few people realize how complicated it is to build-that is until they find themselves lost in a maze of design options, building codes, zoning laws, contractors and so on. No two […]